Ukraine war in in photos: Defusing weapons, saving lives – Grid News

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Ukraine war in in photos: Defusing weapons, saving lives

On Ukrainian land, and in the waters off the country’s coast, a danger looms that will be familiar to veterans of conflict the world over.

The technical term is “unexploded ordnance.” It can mean many things, all of them dangerous: land mines, put down by the Ukrainian resistance to deter a Russian advance; mines in the water, placed by both sides in an ongoing effort to control key lanes in the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov; and the growing number of Russian missiles and explosives that have landed harmlessly but pose a risk of detonation. While the war continues, Ukrainians are working with international assistance to defuse these munitions and render the land safe for farming or travel — or just living.

This curation shows some of that work in progress — from Kyiv to Chernihiv, Kharkiv to the Zaporizhzhia region in the east. It is painstaking work, in terms of the time and care that must be taken; it is of course also extremely dangerous. And if done well, it can save a great many lives.

In Kyiv alone, some 36,000 weapons have already been removed from the land. That’s 36,000 reasons to be thankful.

NOVOSELIVKA, UKRAINE - APRIL 15, 2022 - A chevron of the State Emergency Service rescuer that reads 'Mines' is pictured in Novoselivka which was liberated from Russian invaders, Chernihiv Region, northern Ukraine. (Photo credit should read Oleksandra Yefymenko/ Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty Images)
KYIV REGION, UKRAINE - APRIL 21, 2022 - Ammunition is arranged on the ground during a mine clearance mission near Bervytsia, a village liberated from Russian occupiers, Kyiv Region, northern Ukraine. (Photo credit should read Evgen Kotenko/ Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty Images)
KYIV, UKRAINE - 2022/04/09: Andrey Bychenko (32), from Gosteml, Kyiv Oblast, injured with multiple bone fractures and severe blood loss caused by a Russian land mine on February 25 displays a smartphone screen with a photo of his friend and co-worker who was killed after stepping on a landmine. As the war continue to rage, numerous Ukrainian civilians have been injured, with many being treated in hospitals in Kyiv. According to the United Nations, up to March 23, over 977 civilians had been killed and 1,594 injured. (Photo by Alex Chan Tsz Yuk/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
HRYHORIVKA, UKRAINE - APRIL 20, 2022 - An expert of a State Emergency Service bomb squad wades through the marshland to reach the pasture where the dangerous remains of an Uragan rocket are stuck, Hryhorivka, Zaporizhzhia Region, southeastern Ukraine. (Photo by Dmytro Smolyenko/Ukrinform/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
HRYHORIVKA, UKRAINE - APRIL 20, 2022 - An expert of a State Emergency Service bomb squad fixes his helmet during the works to dispose of the dangerous remains of an Uragan rocket stuck on the pasture, Hryhorivka, Zaporizhzhia Region, southeastern Ukraine. (Photo by Dmytro Smolyenko/Ukrinform/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
HRYHORIVKA, UKRAINE - APRIL 20, 2022 - An expert of a State Emergency Service bomb squad holds the remains of an Uragan rocket stuck in pastureland during a mine clearance effort, Hryhorivka, Zaporizhzhia Region, southeastern Ukraine.  (Photo by Dmytro Smolyenko/Ukrinform/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
HORENKA, UKRAINE - MAY 27, 2022 - Experts of the State Emergency Service carry out a mine clearance mission to counter the consequences of the hostilities, Horenka village, Bucha district, Kyiv Region, northern Ukraine. This photo cannot be distributed in the Russian Federation. (Photo credit should read Pavlo_Bagmut/ Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty Images)
HORENKA, UKRAINE - MAY 27: Ukrainian bomb disposal experts and de-mining teams clear a lake and field of unexploded munitions and mines in Kyiv suburb on May 27, 2022 in Horenka, Ukraine. Sappers of the State Emergency Service seized 150 explosive devices during a survey of the water area in Ukraine. In the vast majority, in the Kyiv Oblast. Lake Blakytne in Horenka village was at the epicenter of shelling by Russian troops trying to capture Kyiv. During two days of work here, pyrotechnics and divers of SES neutralized 10 munitions, including artillery shells, grenade launchers, and explosive elements from volley fire systems. Since Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022, 122,555 explosive devices have been neutralized, including 1,979 aircraft bombs. An area of 23,888 hectares was surveyed. The demining and clearing of unexploded munitions in Ukraine after 2022 Russian large-scale invasion could take between 5-7 years. (Photo by Oleksii Samsonov/Global Images Ukraine via Getty Images)
LVIV, UKRAINE - 2022/05/24: Valyria, a new recruit, is given thirty minutes to clear a lane of simulated anti-personnel landmines. In preparation for Russian tactics, instructors stack two mines atop each other to catch trainees off-guard. Ukrainian military officers train themselves during the territorial defence exercise in Lviv. Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February 2022, triggering the largest military attack in Europe since World War II. (Photo by Mihir Melwani/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
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