Monetary aid to Ukraine is now around $50B: War in Ukraine in data

Introducing Grid Health, our new weekly health and policy newsletter

The Ukraine War in data: $9 billion in U.S. military aid; more than $50 billion overall

American pledges of aid for Ukraine have come at a dizzying pace and scale. The flood of spending is remarkable for a conflict in which U.S. forces are not directly involved. Fresh U.S. pledges totaling $5.5 billion warrant a look at the overall numbers.

This week the Biden administration announced a pair of new infusions of aid to Ukraine, both in the billions of dollars.

The first is an authorization of $1 billion in additional military aid. The Pentagon called it the largest direct shipment of weaponry to date, which includes ammunition for advanced rocket systems, Javelin anti-tank weapons, explosives, medical supplies and more. Perhaps the most important piece of the package: rockets for the HIMARS launchers that have proved as close to a battlefield game-changer as any weapon the U.S. and NATO have sent to Ukraine.

Separately, the United States said this week that it is providing another $4.5 billion in nonmilitary aid, intended to help Ukraine “maintain essential functions,” according to the United States Agency for International Development. The money will be funneled through the World Bank.

ADVERTISEMENT

The military package is the 18th disbursement of military assistance since August 2021, Colin Kahl, the under secretary of defense for policy, told reporters. It brings total U.S. military aid to Ukraine to $9.8 billion since Russia’s invasion in February, Kahl said.

Taken together, congressional authorizations of military and nonmilitary aid to Ukraine are now around $50 billion.

For some perspective, consider these figures: Among top recipients of U.S. military assistance in 2020, Israel received $3.3 billion, Afghanistan $2.8 billion and Egypt $1.3 billion. The totality of U.S. military aid — spread across 157 nations — amounted to $11.6 billion. The Ukraine military outlay for 2022 is now more than three-fourths of that figure — and there are still more than four months left in 2022. There are almost certainly more shipments of weapons to come.

Grid’s reporting is based on the best available data and reporting; in some cases, we explained a range of figures or the reason we chose one over another. We originally published this document March 24 and will update it every Thursday as long as the war persists.

Civilians killed: at least 5,400 (probably thousands more)

On June 7, a Ukrainian official said at least 40,000 Ukrainian civilians had been killed or wounded since the war began. The official offered no breakdown of dead versus wounded. The United Nations’ latest estimate of civilians killed is more than 5,400, but it consistently notes that the figure is an undercount, as is its estimate of total casualties — a combination of deaths and injuries — given as more than 12,000. (Updated Aug. 10; source.)

ADVERTISEMENT

Ukrainian soldiers killed: 10,000 to 11,000

On June 10, top advisers to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy estimated that 10,000 Ukrainian soldiers had been killed since the war began. U.S. intelligence officials have put the number at 5,500 to 11,000 Ukrainian soldiers killed since the invasion. Also on June 10, an adviser to Zelenskyy said that Ukraine was losing as many as 200 soldiers each day. (Updated June 15; source, source.)

Russian soldiers killed: 1,351 to 38,000

Ukraine has raised its estimate of Russian soldiers killed in the conflict to 38,000. NATO has estimated Russian troop losses at between 7,000 and 15,000. Russian officials earlier claimed 1,351 troop losses, though spokesman Dimitry Peskov said there have been “significant losses of troops, and it’s a huge tragedy for us.” (Updated July 16; source, source, source.)

Russian generals killed: 8 to 13

A retired Russian general was reportedly shot down over Luhansk in late May — by Ukrainian counts the 13th Russian general to be killed in Ukraine. Previously, the Defense Intelligence Agency reported that eight to 10 Russian generals had been killed in Ukraine. Grid’s Tom Nagorski and Joshua Keating previously reported on the possible explanations for this “inconceivable” toll: poor communications and command-and-control structures within the Russian military. (Updated May 25; source, source.)

Total displaced Ukrainians: at least 12 million

There are more than 6.3 million Ukrainian refugees reported in other European countries currently. U.N. data indicates that more than 10 million have crossed the border since the start of the war, but millions have returned home, largely from Poland, as Nikhil Kumar and Kseniia Lisnycha reported. The International Organization for Migration’s latest survey of internally displaced Ukrainians, in late June, found more Ukrainians returning home from within Ukraine, but more than 6 million remained displaced within their own country. (Updated Aug. 10; source, source.)

Internally displaced Ukrainians: 6.6 million

An overview of the violence


Global food markets: Wheat prices decrease 11 percent since invasion, after weeks of fluctuation

Grid coverage this week

Learn more: Grid’s 360s on the Ukraine War

  • Alex Leeds Matthews
    Alex Leeds Matthews

    Data Visualization Reporter

    Alex Leeds Matthews is a data visualization reporter at Grid.

  • Matt Stiles
    Matt Stiles

    Senior Data Visualization Reporter

    Matt Stiles is the senior data visualization reporter for Grid.

  • Tom Nagorski
    Tom Nagorski

    Global Editor

    Tom Nagorski is the global editor at Grid, where he oversees our coverage of global security, U.S.-China relations, migration trends, global economics and U.S. foreign policy.

  • Justin Rood
    Justin Rood

    Investigations Editor

    Justin Rood is the investigations editor for Grid, overseeing our team of award-winning investigative and data reporters.

TOPICS

Ukraine